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  • WATER
  • BROWN RICE
  • TUNA IN WATER
  • BEANS (BLACK, PINTO, KIDNEY, ETC.)
  • WHOLE WHEAT PASTA
  • VEGGIES
  • FRUIT
  • EGG WHITES
  • OATS
  • ALMOND MILK/SOY MILK
  • CHICKEN
  • SALMON
  • TILAPIA
  • TURKEY
  • GREEK YOGURT
  • GRANOLA
  • ALMONDS/ WALNUTS
  • AVOCADO
  • ALMOND BUTTER/ PEANUT BUTTER
  • POTATOES/ SWEET POTATOE

I know I’m probably missing out on stuff but this is mainly what’s in my diet. I’ve been clean eating for about 3 months and I recently ate a burger and my stomach wasn’t happy with me at all. Back to clean eating.

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Are Supplements a True Substitute for Real Food?
While some may have predicted that the day would come when we no longer needed to eat food and could derive the nutrients our bodies needed from taking a pill, that day is not yet here. And the more we learn about food and nutrients, their roles and interactions, the more scientists realize that this day may never come. Through decades of research, we have learned that foods provide far more than just calories, vitamins and minerals. Food provides other important nutrients like antioxidants, phytochemicals and fiber which reduce the risk of a number of chronic diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes
and age-related macular degeneration (1,6). Supplements have yet to offer these “ingredients” or even this
same protection (3).

In light of the possible limitations of supplements, does anyone really need to take one? While it is hard to make
a blanket statement such as “all children” or “all pregnant women” require a supplement, there are certain categories and instances where we can make certain generalizations.

Supplements are a multi-billion dollar industry with people under the false impression that taking supplements is improving their health and/or performance (4). Can we rely on supplements to provide us with additional vitamins and minerals not found in a well balanced diet? Perhaps. But supplements are not regulated as drugs; they are regulated as food, in accordance with the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) passed by Congress in 1994. The result is that the FDA has very little regulation over the supplements sold in this country— they do not analyze the content of dietary supplements nor do they approve the labels on the bottle. Additionally, the FDA can only remove a product from the market after it has been proven unsafe. Usually a supplement is proven unsafe and removed from the market after people taking it get sick or even die.

So what can athletes and individuals who are interested in taking a supplement do to protect themselves? Fortunately, there are two tools available to help consumers choose a safe supplement. One is to look for the U.S. Pharmacopeia or “USP” seal. The “USP” seal means that the product has been independently tested and reviewed by USP to verify ingredient and product integrity, purity, and potency for the manufacturers who choose to participate (7). However, it does not mean that this supplement has been tested for safety or effectiveness. Another option is to search the supplement reviews available on ConsumerLab.com, which is an independent, non-profit testing agency. This organization selects products and tests for accuracy of content (e.g., a supplement that says it contains 400 IU of vitamin D actually contains that amount) and also for contaminants in the supplement. For example, supplements may be found to contain unacceptable amounts of lead, which is a health hazard, especially to children.

Bottom Line

Choose food first and, supplement, only as needed.

References
1. Kawasaki B, Hurt E, Mistree T, Farrar W.
Targeting cancer stem cells with phytochemicals.
Mol Interv. 8(4):174 – 184, 2008.
2. Kreider R, Rasmussen C, Melton C, et al.
Long-term creatine supplementation does not
adversely affect clinical markers of health.
Proceedings of the American College of Sports
Medicine 2000 Annual Scientific Meeting; 2000
May 31 – June 3: Indianapolis (IN).
3. Lin J, Cook N, Albert C, Zaharris E, Gaziano
M, Buring J, Manson J. Vitamins C and E and
Beta Carotene Supplementation and Cancer
Risk: A Randomized Controlled Trial. J Natl
Cancer Inst. 101:14 – 23, 2009.
4. Market Research Web site (Internet). North
Adams (MA): Market Research; (Retrieved
2009, May 1). Available from: http://www.
marketresearch.com.
5. Nishino H, Murakoshi M, Mou X, Wada S,
Masuda M, Ohsaka Y, Satomi Y,
6. Jinno K. Cancer prevention by
phytochemicals. Oncology. 1:38 – 40, 2005.
7. Parry GJ, Bredesen DE. Sensory neuropathy
with low-dose pyridoxine. Neurology. 35:1466 –
1468, 1985.
8. U.S. Pharmacopeia Web site (Internet).
Rockville (MD): U.S. Pharmacopeia; (Retrieved
2009, May 1). Available from: http://www.usp.
org.

Nutrition For Recovery

Athletes are always seeking ways to enhance performance and delay fatigue. Muscle glycogen is the major fuel source during prolonged, moderate to high-intensity exercise, and there is a direct relationship between depleted muscle glycogen and fatigue. Therefore, muscle glycogen repletion is vital to recovery time and maintaining top performance for athletes at all levels (1). Glycogen repletion is important to ensure an athlete’s quick muscle recovery for subsequent practices, especially those who train, or must compete, multiple times in a single day (1). Timing, composition and the quantity of a post-exercise meal or snack is dependent upon the length and intensity of exercises, timing of the next exercise session, as well as an individual’s needs (1).

Carbohydrates For Recovery—

How Much?

The current recommendation for daily carbohydrates (CHO) consumption is 5 – 7g CHO/kg/day for the general athlete and 7 – 10g/kg/day for the endurance athlete (1). Consuming CHO immediately after exercise accelerates glycogen repletion (10) because there is increased blood flow to the muscles, which results in heightened sensitivity to insulin (9). Sufficient CHO ingestion over the next 24 hours is also important. Current recommendations are to consume 1 – 1.5g of CHO/kg of body weight within 30 minutes after exercise and then again at 2-hour intervals for the next six hours (1). See Table 1 for some ideas on what to consume within 30 minutes post-exercise.

Carbohydrates For Recovery—

What Type?

The type of carbohydrate (CHO) an athlete consumes after exercise can affect how much and how quickly he or she resynthesizes glycogen. Foods and/or beverages containing glucose/ sucrose, and those having a high glycemic index are preferred. Glucose and sucrose are preferred over fructose (1), as fructose promotes a lower level of glycogen resynthesis as compared to glucose (3) and larger amounts of fructose may promote gastrointestinal distress due to its slower absorption rate(3). High glycemic index foods induce higher muscle glycogen levels as compared to low glycemic index foods (1). Readily available foods, such as whole grain cereal and skim milk, have been found to be an effective post-exercise fuel (2). In fact, one study found that the carbohydrate to protein combination found in a bowl of whole grain cereal and skim milk had a similar effect on muscle glycogen repletion as did sports drinks (2). The combination was also found to positively affect protein synthesis. From this research, it seems that whole foods can be a good alternative to commercial sports drinks, if preferred by the athlete.

Endurance exercise

Endurance athletes may benefit from consuming protein along with carbohydrates after exercise as this combination has been shown to reduce markers of muscle damage and improve post-exercise recovery. This could also have a positive effect on subsequent performances (8). Some studies have demonstrated a benefit of Branched Chain Amino Acids (BCAA) on muscle recovery (6). BCAA’s appear to affect muscle protein metabolism during and after exercise and prevent muscle damage induced by exercise (6). The release of amino acids from muscles is decreased when BCAA’s are ingested (6).

Resistance Exercise

The goal for athletes in resistance-type exercise is to increase muscle mass and strength. The nutrition intervention for this type of activity involves stimulating net muscle protein gains during recovery. PRO ingestion increases the rate of muscle protein synthesis and inhibits protein breakdown after training (10). One study found that during prolonged resistance training, post-exercise consumption of CHO and PRO, 1 – 3 hours after resistance training stimulated improvements in strength and body composition better than a placebo (3). Essential amino acids in a dose of 40g have regularly shown to have an effect in promoting muscle protein synthesis and CHO may enhance this effect (3). The findings suggest ingesting 50 – 75g CHO with 20 – 75g PRO after heavy resistance training (3). Furthermore, adding 10g of creatine has shown to produce a significant increase in body mass as compared to just CHO and PRO (3). See Table 2 for possible CHO and PRO combinations.

Bottom Line

Nutrition post-exercise has been proven to promote recovery for athletes. Post-exercise nutrition has been shown to increase strength and muscle mass in athletes who participate in resistance-type exercises. Timing, composition and amount of post-exercise food is dependent upon the individual, timing of the next exercise session and the activity performed. 

References

1. American Dietetic Association. Position of the American Dietetic

Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports

Medicine: Nutrition and athletic performance. Journal of the American

Dietetic Association. 2009(109).

2. Kammer L, Ding Z, Want B, Hara D, Liao Y, Ivy J. Cereal and nonfat milk

support muscle recovery following exercise. Journal of the International

Society of Sports Nutrition. 2009(6).

3. Kerksick C, Harvey T, Stout J, Campbell B, Wilborn C, Kreider R,

Kalman D, Ziegenfuss T, Lopez H, Landis J, Ivy J, Antonio J. International

Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: Nutrient timing. Journal of the

International Society of Sports Nutrition. 2008(5).

4. Miller SL, Gaine PC, Maresh CM, Armstrong LE, Ebbeling CB, Lamont

LS, Rodriguez NR. The Effects of Nutritional Supplementation Throughout

an Endurance Run on Leucine Kinetics During Recovery. International

Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. 2007(17).

5. Mizuno K PhD, Tanaka M PhD, Nozaki S PhD, Mizuma H PhD, Ataka

S MD, Tahara T PhD, Sugino T MSc, Shirai T MSc, Kajimoto Y PhD,

Kuratsune H PhD, Kajimoto O PhD, Watanabe Y PhD. Antifatigue effects

of coenzyme Q10 during physical fatigue. Applied Nutritional Investigation.

2007.

6. Negro M, Giardina S, Marzani B, Marzatico F. Branched-chain amino acid

supplementation does not enhance athletic performance but affects muscle

recovery and the immune system. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical

Fitness. 2008(48).

7. Rowlands D, Thorp RM, Rossler K, Graham DF, Rockell MJ. Effect of

Protein-Rich Feeding on Recovery After Intense Exercise. International

Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. 2007(17).

8. Saunders, Michael J. Coingestion of Carbohydrate-Protein During

Endurance Exercise: Influence on Performance and Recovery. International

Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 2007(17).

9. Stout, Andrew. Fueling and Weight Management Strategies In Sports

Nutrition. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 2007(07).

10. Van Loon, Luc J.C. Application of Protein or Protein Hydrolysates to

Improve Postexercise Recovery. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and

Exercise Metabolism. 2007(17).

Taken from: NSCA’s Performance Training Journal Volume 9, Issue 2

I chose these exercises because they put more focus onto the quads.

DUMBBELL LUNGE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Directions:

  1. Stand with your torso upright holding two dumbbells in your hands by your sides. This will be your starting position.
  2. Step forward with your right leg around 2 feet or so from the foot being left stationary behind and lower your upper body down, while keeping the torso upright and maintaining balance. Inhale as you go down. Note: As in the other exercises, do not allow your knee to go forward beyond your toes as you come down, as this will put undue stress on the knee joint. Make sure that you keep your front shin perpendicular to the ground.
  3. Using mainly the heel of your foot, push up and go back to the starting position as you exhale.
  4. Repeat the movement for the recommended amount of repetitions and then perform with the left leg.

Caution: This is a movement that requires a great deal of balance so if you suffer from balance problems you may wish to either avoid it or just use your own bodyweight while holding on to a fixed object. Definitely never perform with a barbell on your back if you suffer from balance issues.

ALTERNATIVES:

  • you can perform these walking
  • alternating legs
  • use a barbell across the back if you don’t want to use dumbbells

 

BEAR CRAWL SLED DRAGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Wearing either a harness or a loose weight belt, attach the chain to the back so that you will be facing away from the sled. Bend down so that your hands are on the ground. Your back should be flat and knees bent. This is your starting position.
  2. Begin by driving with legs, alternating left and right. Use your hands to maintain balance and to help pull. Try to keep your back flat as you move over a given distance.

***COURTESY OF BODYBUILDING.COM***

I say RECIPES because Valentine’s Day is around the corner so you may want to cook yourself or you and your significant other something great. I have tried out these recipes from Clean Eating Magazine and they’re amazing. Hope you all Enjoy!!

BREAKFAST

French Toast with Dark Cherry-Citrus Topping

Ingredients:

Topping:

  • 4 oz. dark sweet cherries, thawed and quartered
  • 4 dried apricot halves, diced
  • 1 tsp orange zest
  • 1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1-2 packets of stevia (splenda is fine)
  • 1/2 cup nonfat plain greek-style yogurt

Toast:

  • 1 tbsp safflower oil
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 egg whites
  • 1 tsp orange zest
  • 4 1-oz slices reduced-calorie whole grain bread

Directions:

  1. Prepare topping: In a small saucepan, combine 1/4 cup water, cherries, and apricots and bring to a boil on medium-high heat. Boil for 20 to 30 seconds to reduce mixture slightly. Remove from heat and stir in orange zest, vanilla, and stevia: cover and set aside.
  2. Prepare toast: Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. In a shallow pan whisk eggs, egg whites and orange zest. Working quickly, dip each slice of bread into egg mixture and place on a plate until all slices have been coated. Slide bread slices (instead of lifting off the plate) into skillet and cook for 3 minutes per side or until golden.
  3. To serve, divide cherry mixture evenly among bread slices, then top with yogurt.

CALORIES PER SERVING ( 1 toast, 2 tbsp topping, 2 tbsp yogurt): 210 | Total fat: 8g | Carbs: 23g | Fiber: 4g | Protein: 12g

DINNER

Orange Chipotle Chicken over cilantro rice

Ingredients:

  • 1 tsp chile powder
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt, divided
  • 1 tsp safflower oil
  • 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (about 1 lb), rinsed and patted dry, pounded 1/2 inch thick
  • Juice 1 medium navel orange (1/3 cup orange juice)
  • 2 tbsp pure maple syrup
  • 1 tbsp chopped chipotle chiles in adobo sauce
  • 1 tsp orange zest
  • 2 cups cooked brown rice
  • 1/4 packed cup chopped cilantro leaves

Directions:

  1. In a small bowl, combine chile powder, cumin, and 1/4 tsp salt. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet on medium-high. Tilt skillet to coat bottom lightly. Season both sides of chicken with chile-cumin mixture and cook for 3 minutes per side or until no longer pink in center. Remove from skillet and set aside.
  2. Add orange juice and maple syrup to juice and bits left in skillet and cook for 1 minute to thicken slightly (until it measures 1/4 cup liquid), stirring constantly. Remove from heat, stir in chipotle chiles in adobo sauce and orange zest. Add chicken back to skillet, return to heat and cook for 1 minute on medium-high, turning constantly.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine rice, cilantro and remaining 1/4 tsp salt. Serve chicken over rice and spoon any excess glaze over top of chicken pieces.

CALORIES PER SERVING (3 oz. chicken and 1/2 cup rice): 283 | Total fat: 4g | Carbs: 32g | Fiber: 2g | Protein: 29g

ENJOY!!!!!!!

February is Here!!

February is National Heart Month. Not because it’s Valentines day but because we need to become more aware of Heart Disease.

Here are some facts:

  • About every 25 seconds, an American will have a coronary event
  • Most common heart disease is coronary heart disease
  • In 2010, an estimated 785,000 Americans had a new coronary attack, and about 470,000 had a recurrent attack
  • These conditions put your health at risk of death or disability: arrhythmia, heart failure, peripheral artery disease (PAD), high cholesterol, high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes, tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, and secondhand smoke

It’s time you start helping the people you care about make healthier choices and try to start putting them on a path to a healthier lifestyle. Diet and exercise play a major part.

If you want more information regarding Heart Disease and more about National Heart Month check out: cdc.gov/features/heartmonth

Comp Pics from Bodybuilding.com

I’m not happy with my posing but it will only get better with time. I’m embarrassed about my back posing!!! 5 months til the West Coast Classic!!!

My Competition Story

Getting ready for the Iron Man Magazine Naturally Championship and competing in the competition was such an amazing experience. I can’t believe that I actually did it. There are so many amazing people that have encouraged me and helped me along with this journey that I am going to list EVERY LAST ONE OF THEM!! Without them I don’t think I would’ve still done it.

I have my Twitter Fitness family: @babytatten, @lilfitprincess, @FIT4LIFE2020 @beccasgym, @tracykirby55, @DonaldDDiva, @Sharde2focused, @4amaven, @CommittedTrain, @Bionic_Black, @mrgeecue, @obarmuscle, @Bodybldrmarcus, @SamuelFrauens, @OBARmuscle, @mercedesfitness, @CarrieNyden, @iamkendra86, @elleboogiee, @bikiniorbust, etc (this list can go on forever lol)…

The Rest of the crew: Romalice Reed, Godfrey Cortes, Ryan Liming, Kashka Clay, Donna Spinola, My big cousin Earnest, The VSP Crew: Dan, Joy, Jason, Juan, Hayley, etc., Kemi E, and MY FAMILY…

A BIG THANK YOU TO DRE!!! You stuck it out and sat with me all day!! Thanks for all your love and support! You’re awesome.
I know I’m forgetting so many other people I hope they can forgive me….

Ok so here it is:

Mid October is when I entered the competition and I was really hesitant about doing it but I thought why not. So I started to diet and took my first progress pic in November and I looked like this:

As you can tell I had a lot of work to do 🙂

So for the next few months I ate CLEAN and worked out to the point where I couldn’t even move. I would wake up at 6am to be at the gym by 7 and workout til about 8:30 and then go to class from 10-2:15 and then go home lol….I did that everyday about 5-6 days a week for about the first month just to get my body into a routine. So for the next 8 weeks I did Metabolic Conditioning classes @ Velocity Sports Performance, lifted weights, ate right, and here is the finished product:

So the last few weeks up until the competition sucked major donkey balls (YES! Donkey balls). It sucked because at this point I wanted “real” food. I wanted chips, cupcakes, candy, burgers, etc. I wanted to eat everything I could get my hands on. The week of the competition wasn’t as bad as I thought until Thursday rolled around. On Thursday I had started drinking Metamucil to start pulling the water out of muscles and drop water weight. I was so dehydrated that the more water I drank the more my head hurt. I could feel the water being pulled out of my quads and my arms. Friday I couldn’t drink any water at all especially if I wanted to dry out. So I started eating 1/2 cup of dry oatmeal and 2 oz of chicken breast every 2 hours. Trying to eat 1/2 cup of oatmeal dry was HARD! I didn’t really sleep Friday night because I had to dry out and my alarm would go off every 2 hours just to make sure I was up to eat another 1/2 cup.

When I did try and catch a few zzz’s I was in pain because I could feel the water being pulled out of my muscles. TRUST ME it was bearable it just hurt. So I had packed my bag and was just ready to get to:

So all competitors had to be there at 8am for the meeting and 8:30 am check in..Pre-judging was at 10 am. So I checked in and found the nearest bathroom to do my hair since the expensive ass hair people took up all the plugs in our dressing area 😦 Hair was done make-up was done the only thing left to do was get ready for pre-judging. So we were lined up in our Class A,B,C,D (for my people that don’t know what classes are: it’s just based on your height). So the expediters backstage sent out Class A and B together so the judges were a little frustrated because we (class B) had to leave the stage and come back out. We did our model turns and then all lined up and did quarter turns. Filed off stage and were told to be back at 3:15.

So I walked around the expo with my BFF Dre and we walked around FOREVER!!! He did this max rep competition where you had to bench press your weight as many times as you can in 30 seconds. We laughed because one guy who weighed 121 pounds did his weight about 41 times so everybody after him was like pretty much forget it. I really wanted to take pics with Alicia Marie, Ava Cowan, and Jamie Eason but the line for Bodybuilding.com was longer than the line to get into the Expo so I was a little disappointed. I wanted to take a pic with Lou Ferrigno but he was charging $20 a pic. I said KICK ROCKS LOU!!! We watched the powerlifting competition and some of the other competitions that were there. It was a really fun expo.

So 3:15 came and it was time to get ready again. Jay Cutler (NOT FOOTBALL LOL) got on stage and spoke for an hour then it was time for finals. So they started with the Men and each competitor had 60 secs of posing…I was so cold backstage and just ready to get everything over with cause by this point I was HUNGRY and getting frustrated because Bikini Bite was causing me to stick to the seat I was sitting in lol…So the Pro Tan crew got me all greased up and I just waited back stage until the guys were over since Figure was last.

While the men were doing their posing the crowd was HUGE!!! By the time I came out the crowd was NON-EXISTENT!!! We were supposed to be done at 6 but we didn’t get done until almost 7. Here is the VERDICT: So here were my stats on competition day: 34-26-38 3/4 weighed in at 129 with 13% body fat… When I started I was: 34-28-39 1/2 136 with 21% body fat. So I am now about 117 pounds of muscle!!

This experience was priceless! It was worth every bit of sweat, tears, frustration, and hunger. I had the 3 D’s: Determination, Dedication, and Discipline. It helped me get through it all.

I got on that stage without paying for a trainer, a posing coach, an expensive suit, or Pro Tan. I did it all on my own. You have to learn from your mistakes and find out what works best for you. Just because it worked for someone else doesn’t mean that it will work for you.

Now it’s time to BULK UP and lean out again for my next competition in June. I’m going to compete in the West Coast Classic. Competing is really expensive. So time to save up and shoot for the stars!!

I AM OFFICIALLY AN NPC FIGURE COMPETITOR AND WINNER!! NOBODY CAN TAKE THAT AWAY FROM ME!!

P.S. I can still feel the water being pulled out of my muscles 😉

P.P.S. MAKE SURE TO PICK UP THE MARCH IRON MAN MAGAZINE AS ALL THE COMPETITION PHOTOS ARE IN IT

Today hasn’t been a good day….

This morning around 9:50 my mom called me to tell me that my Great Grandmother had passed. I am completely heartbroken because I wasn’t able to tell her goodbye. I haven’t been able to eat much, let alone stop from crying. I miss her so much already. She had a long fulfilled 94 years of life. She will forever be in my heart.

Fitness guru Jack LaLanne died today as well. He was the founder of the Modern Fitness Movement.

Here is the article:

LOS ANGELES — Jack LaLanne, the fitness guru who inspired television viewers to trim down, eat well and pump iron for decades before diet and exercise became a national obsession, died Sunday. He was 96.

LaLanne died of respiratory failure due to pneumonia Sunday afternoon at his home in Morro Bay on California’s central coast, his longtime agent Rick Hersh said.

LaLanne ate healthy and exercised every day of his life up until the end, Hersh said.

“I have not only lost my husband and a great American icon, but the best friend and most loving partner anyone could ever hope for,” Elaine LaLanne, LaLanne’s wife of 51 years and a frequent partner in his television appearances, said in a written statement.

He maintained a youthful physique and joked in 2006 that “I can’t afford to die. It would wreck my image.”

Former “Price is Right” host Bob Barker credited LaLanne’s encouragement with helping him to start exercising often.

“He never lost enthusiasm for life and physical fitness,” the 87-year-old Barker told The Associated Press on Sunday. “I saw him in about 2007 and he still looked remarkably good. He still looked like the same enthusiastic guy that he always was.”

Television staple
LaLanne (pronounced lah-LAYN’) credited a sudden interest in fitness with transforming his life as a teen, and he worked tirelessly over the next eight decades to transform others’ lives, too.

“The only way you can hurt the body is not use it,” LaLanne said. “Inactivity is the killer and, remember, it’s never too late.”

His workout show was a television staple from the 1950s to the ’70s. LaLanne and his dog Happy encouraged kids to wake their mothers and drag them in front of the television set. He developed exercises that used no special equipment, just a chair and a towel.

He also founded a chain of fitness studios that bore his name and in recent years touted the value of raw fruit and vegetables as he helped market a machine called Jack LaLanne’s Power Juicer.

When he turned 43 in 1957, he performed more than 1,000 push-ups in 23 minutes on the “You Asked For It” television show. At 60, he swam from Alcatraz Island to Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco — handcuffed, shackled and towing a boat. Ten years later, he performed a similar feat in Long Beach harbor.

“I never think of my age, never,” LaLanne said in 1990. “I could be 20 or 100. I never think about it, I’m just me. Look at Bob Hope, George Burns. They’re more productive than they’ve ever been in their whole lives right now.”

Praised by Schwarzenegger
Fellow bodybuilder and former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger credited LaLanne with taking exercise out of the gymnasium and into living rooms.

“He laid the groundwork for others to have exercise programs, and now it has bloomed from that black and white program into a very colorful enterprise,” Schwarzenegger said in 1990.

In 1936 in his native Oakland, LaLanne opened a health studio that included weight-training for women and athletes. Those were revolutionary notions at the time, because of the theory that weight training made an athlete slow and “muscle bound” and made a woman look masculine.

“You have to understand that it was absolutely forbidden in those days for athletes to use weights,” he once said. “It just wasn’t done. We had athletes who used to sneak into the studio to work out.

“It was the same with women. Back then, women weren’t supposed to use weights. I guess I was a pioneer,” LaLanne said.

The son of poor French immigrants, he was born in 1914 and grew up to become a sugar addict, he said.

The turning point occurred one night when he heard a lecture by pioneering nutritionist Paul Bragg, who advocated the benefits of brown rice, whole wheat and a vegetarian diet.

“He got me so enthused,” LaLanne said. “After the lecture I went to his dressing room and spent an hour and a half with him. He said, ‘Jack, you’re a walking garbage can.'”

Soon after, LaLanne constructed a makeshift gym in his back yard. “I had all these firemen and police working out there and I kind of used them as guinea pigs,” he said.

He said his own daily routine usually consisted of two hours of weightlifting and an hour in the swimming pool.

“It’s a lifestyle, it’s something you do the rest of your life,” LaLanne said. “How long are you going to keep breathing? How long do you keep eating? You just do it.”

In addition to his wife, he is survived by two sons, Dan and Jon, and a daughter, Yvonne.

May they rest in peace.

Coming in February….

Of course your usual move and recipe of the month
But also: questions that you have wanted me to answer, my results and pics from the Iron Man Magazine Naturally Championships, a book review as well as notes that I have taken from a book that I am currently reading.

Hope January 2011 was a great month for everyone. If you have a question that you may want me to answer feel free to email me: monique.battiste@gmail.com or Tweet me @monique510