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IT’S MOVING DAY

I have officially put on my big girl panties and have moved to http://www.moniquesfitness.com

You will still get your updates with recipes, research, etc.

moniquesfitness.com is under construction but I hope to see you there soon.

Protein Requirements for Athletes

A well-designed diet for an athlete is a combination of proper energy intake, proper timing, along with proper training. An energy deficient diet during training may lead to loss of muscle mass and strength, increased susceptibility to illness, and increased prevalence of overreaching and/or overtraining (7). People who follow a general fitness program can generally meet their nutritional needs with a healthy, well-balanced diet. However, the caloric and protein needs of a highly trained athlete are different
and will be discussed here.

Considerable debate ensues regarding the proper intake of protein for athletes. The current recommended level of protein intake (0.8 g/kg/day) is estimated to be sufficient to meet the needs of nearly all (97.5%) healthy men and women age 19 years and older (2). This amount of protein intake may be appropriate for non-exercising individuals, but it is “likely not suffi cient to off set the oxidation of protein/amino acids during exercise (approximately 1 –5% of the total energy cost of exercise)” (2). If an athlete does not ingest sufficient amounts of protein, he or she will maintain a negative nitrogen balance, which can increase protein catabolism and slow recovery (7). Nitrogen balance is quantifed by calculating the total amount of dietary protein that enters the body and the total amount of the nitrogen that is excreted (9). Table 1 provides general guidelines for protein and caloric intake based on the level of activity.

It is important to remember that not all protein is the same. Proteins differ based on the source, the amino acid profile and the methods of isolating the protein (7). Great dietary sources of low-fat, high-quality protein are skinless chicken, fish, egg whites and skim milk while the highest quality supplemental sources are whey, colostrum, casein, milk proteins and egg protein (7). The Food
and Agriculture Organization (FAO) established a method for determining the quality of a protein source by “utilizing the amino acid composition of a test protein relative to a reference amino acid pattern and then correcting for differences in protein digestibility,” (4).

Two of the most widely used protein supplements are casein and whey, which can both be found in milk products. Research has demonstrated that “whey protein elicits a sharp, rapid increase of plasma amino acids following ingestion, while the consumption of casein induces a moderate, prolonged increase in plasma amino acids that was sustained over a 7-hour postprandial time period,” (1). The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) recommends that athletes obtain protein through whole foods, and when supplements are ingested they should contain both casein and whey “due to their ability to increase muscle protein accretion,” (2).

While casein and whey have been found to be beneficial, other research exists to support the benefits of leucine. Approximately one third of skeletal muscle protein is made up of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), leucine, isoleucine and valine (8). Research suggests that of these three, leucine plays the most significant role in stimulating protein synthesis (5). Therefore, supplementation
of branched-chain amino acids may be beneficial to athletes.

Researchers at the Department of Human Biology at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, conducted a study to determine post-exercise muscle protein synthesis and whole body protein balance following the combined ingestion of carbohydrates with or without protein and/or free leucine (6). Eight male subjects were randomly assigned to three trials in which they consumed drinks containing carbohydrates, carbohydrates/protein, or carbohydrates/protein/leucine following 45mins of resistance exercise. Results of the study showed that whole body protein breakdown rates were lower, and whole body protein synthesis rates were higher in the carbohydrate/protein and carbohydrates/protein/leucine trials compared with the carbohydrate trial. The addition of leucine resulted in a lower protein oxidation rate compared with the carbohydrate/protein trial. The study concluded that
co-ingestion of protein and leucine stimulates muscle protein synthesis and optimizes whole body protein balance compared
with the intake of carbohydrates only (6).

BCAA supplementation has been shown to be particularly beneficial during aerobic exercise because of an increase in the free tryptophan/BCAA ratio (5). During prolonged aerobic exercise, the amount of free tryptophan increases and therefore the amount of tryptophan entering the brain increases, resulting in fatigue (5). BCAAs are transported to the brain through the same carrier as tryptophan, so when BCAAs are present in the plasma, in signifi cant amounts, they may decrease the amount of tryptophan reaching the brain, therefore decreasing feelings of fatigue (2). It has been suggested that the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for leucine alone should be 45 mg/kg/day for sedentary individuals, and even higher for active individuals (8). A deficiency in BCAA intake from whole foods can be supplemented by consuming whey protein (2).

In conclusion, major organizations recommend athletes consume more than the RDA for protein, approximately 1.4 – 2.0 g/kg of body weight/d (2,4). Every attempt to obtain protein from whole foods is ideal; however supplementation is a safe way of obtaining the needed amounts of protein when necessary.

Table 1. Caloric and Protein Intake Guidelines

Activity Level Caloric Intake Protein Intake
General Activity 25 -35 kcals/kg/day 0.8 – 1.0 g/kg/day
Strength Training Athletes 50 – 80 kcals/kg/day 1.4 – 1.8+ g/kg/day
Endurance Athletes 150 – 200 kcals/kg/day 1.2 – 1.4 g/kg/day

Source: The Position Statement from the Dietitians of Canada, the American Dietetic Association, and the American College of Sports Medicine, Canadian
Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research in the Winter of 2000, 61(4):176-192 (3).

References

1. Boirie Y, Dangin M, Gachon P, Vasson MP, Maubois JL, and Beaufrere, B. Slow and fast dietary proteins differently modulate postprandial protein accretion. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 94(26): 14930 – 5, 1997.

2. Campbell, B, Kredier, R, Ziegenfuss, T. et al. International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: Protein and exercise. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 4(8), 2007.
3. The Position Statement from the Dietitians of Canada, the American Dietetic Association, and the American College of Sports Medicine. Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research 61(4): 176 – 192, 2000.
4. Darragh, A, and Hodgkinson, S. Quantifying the digestibility of dietary protein. The Journal of Nutrition 130: 1850S – 1856S, 2000.

5. Kimball, SR, and Jefferson, LS. Signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms through which branched-chain amino acids mediate
translational control of protein synthesis. Journal of Nutrition 136(1 Suppl): 227S – 31S, 2006.

6. Koopman R, Wagenmakers AJ, et al. Combined ingestion of protein and free leucine with carbohydrate increases post-exercise muscle protein synthesis in vivo in male subjects. American Journal of Physiology Endocrinology and Metabolism 288(4): E645 – 53, 2005.

7. Kreider, RB, Wilborn, CD, Taylor, L, Cambpell, B, et al. ISSN exercise & sport nutrition review: Research & recommendations. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 7(7.2), 2010.

8. Leucine supplementation and intensive training. Sports Medicine. 27(6): 347 – 58, 1999.

9. Rand WM, Pellett, PL, and Young, VR. Meta-analysis of nitrogen balance studies for estimating protein requirements in healthy adults. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 77(1): 109 – 27, 2003.

 

 

  1. While standing straight, hold a barbell plate in both hands at the 3 and 9 o’clock positions. Your palms should be facing each other and your arms should be extended and locked with a slight bend at the elbows and the plate should be down near your waist in front of you as far as you can go. Tip: The arms will remain in this position throughout the exercise. This will be your starting position.
  2. Slowly raise the plate as you exhale until it is a little above shoulder level. Hold the contraction for a second. Tip: make sure that you do not swing the weight or bend at the elbows. Your torso should remain stationary throughout the movement as well.
  3. As you inhale, slowly lower the plate back down to the starting position.
  4. Repeat for the recommended amount of repetitions.

Variations: You can use dumbbells, barbells, cables or exercise bands to perform this movement.

 

***COURTESY OF BODYBUILDING.COM***

This is my FAVORITE exercise because it really isolates the shoulders and I like the pain afterwards :)

hmmm so today is Tuesday….

Alarm goes off at 5:45am. I got up and took a shower, got dressed, and packed my backpack. Grabbed my lunch/snack out of the fridge.

My lunch/snack: a can of tuna drained, apple, Almond butter and jelly sandwich on multigrain bread and my gallon of water.

By 7:15 I’m at the gym. Today was shoulders so I did about 20 minutes of cardio on the spin bike (even though the seats aren’t big enough and hurt like hell). I did smith machine shoulder presses, one arm machine shoulder press, lateral raises, and rear raises today. Today wasn’t so bad and I really like working my shoulders.

8:45 crack open my Better Oats Oatmeal and eat that as my post workout meal. Class doesn’t start til 11 so I sit in the strength lab and study for a while.

It’s finally 11am so my class is Weight Training and all I did in class was demonstrate the power clean and ended up cleaning 135 lbs. That’s my personal best..After class I went and ate my snack even though the sandwich and apple were gone already :(

So I hung out in the strength lab for a while and wrote pieces of songs (yes, I write songs sometimes). Then I left school and headed home.

Got home changed clothes and went for a run. I ran to Disneyland which is about 3 miles from my house and walked back home.

Now I’m back home and showered. Haven’t made dinner yet which will be Tilapia and veggies with the rest of the gallon of water that I have left.

Tomorrow morning up at 5:45 to do it all over again this time I’ll be in class from 10-2 and then have to film the Snatch (olympic lift) and overhead squat for a class project so that video will be up soon.

I currently work 2 jobs and go to school full time. In between all of that I have to workout (West Coast Classic on June 25), stick to my diet, study, train people, and find time to sleep.

I’m taking 17 units when 12 units is considered full time.

People don’t realize that when you compete and go to school full time it’s hard to find time to do much of anything else. My days either start early or end the next day. Lately I’ve been having 21-22 hour days. I don’t know where I find the energy to make it through school and running back and forth between 2 jobs.

Competing isn’t for the weak at heart or the ones who get easily discouraged. Everything in life that is worth having never comes easy. And my NPC Pro Card won’t be handed to me. I’m working my ass off for it. Yes, there is criticism that comes with competing and there are some haters who wish they could gain muscle or drop weight as fast as you or someone else. But it’s ok it’s motivation. My motivation is someone telling me that I can’t do something or that I’m this or that.

I push myself because I know that there is someone out there who is working harder than I am and I refuse to let someone else out do me.

Just know this when competing: Pain is TEMPORARY, the results are EVIDENT AND PERMANENT!

LADIES this is for you

I was visiting womenshealth.com and I came across an article that is perfect for the women who don’t like to lift weights because of the fear of getting “BIG” or “BUFF”

What I hear the most is this: “I don’t want to get big I just want to tone!” Well to tone you have to lift weights and more than the 5 lb dumbbells.

Lose Your Fear of Weightlifting

By Adam Campbell

Just because you’re not vying for 20-inch biceps or thunderously strong thighs like the muscle heads in the gym doesn’t mean you should shun the weight room. Lifting weights gives you an edge over belly fat, stress, heart disease, and cancer—and it’s also the single most effective way to look hot in a bikini. Yet somehow women are still hesitant: Only about a fifth of females strength train two or more times a week.

Here are 12 reasons you shouldn’t live another day without hitting the weights.

  1. You’ll Lose 40 Percent More Fat: If you think cardio is the key to blasting belly fat, keep reading: When Penn State researchers put dieters into three groups—no exercise, aerobic exercise only, or aerobic exercise and weight training—they all lost around 21 pounds, but the lifters shed six more pounds of fat than those who didn’t pump iron. Why? The lifters’ loss was almost pure fat; the others lost fat and muscle.

    Other research on dieters who don’t lift shows that, on average, 75 percent of their weight loss is from fat, while 25 percent is from muscle. Muscle loss may drop your scale weight, but it doesn’t improve your reflection in the mirror and it makes you more likely to gain back the flab you lost. However, if you weight train as you diet, you’ll protect your hard-earned muscle and burn more fat.

  2. Your Clothes Will Fit Better: Research shows that between the ages of 30 and 50, you’ll likely lose 10 percent of your body’s total muscle. Worse yet, it’s likely to be replaced by fat over time, says a study. And that increases your waist size, because one pound of fat takes up 18 percent more space than one pound of muscle.
  3. You’ll Burn More Calories: Lifting increases the number of calories you burn while your butt is parked on the couch. That’s because after each strength workout, your muscles need energy to repair their fibers. In fact, researchers found that when people did a total-body workout with just three big-muscle moves, their metabolisms were raised for 39 hours afterward. They also burned a greater percentage of calories from fat compared with those who didn’t lift.

    Lifting gives you a better burn during exercise too: Doing a circuit of eight moves (which takes about eight minutes) can expend 159 to 231 calories. That’s about what you’d burn if you ran at a 10-mile-per-hour pace for the same duration.

  4. Your Diet Will Improve: Exercise helps your brain stick to a diet plan. University of Pittsburgh researchers studied 169 overweight adults and found that those who didn’t follow a three-hours-a-week training regimen ate more than their allotted 1,500 calories a day. The reverse was also true—sneaking snacks sabotaged their workouts. The study authors say both diet and exercise likely remind you to stay on track, aiding your weight-loss goals.
  5. You’ll Handle Stress Better: Break a sweat in the weight room and you’ll stay cool under pressure. Scientists determined that the fittest people exhibited lower levels of stress hormones than those who were the least fit. Another study found that after a stressful situation, the blood pressure levels of people with the most muscle returned to normal faster than the levels of those with the least muscle.
  6. You’ll Be Happier: Yoga isn’t the only Zen-inducing kind of exercise. Researchers found that people who performed three weight workouts a week for six months significantly improved their scores on measures of anger and overall mood.
  7. You’ll Build Stronger Bones: As you age, bone mass goes to pot, which increases your likelihood of one day suffering a debilitating fracture. The good news: A study found that 16 weeks of resistance training increased hip bone density and elevated blood levels of osteocalcin—a marker of bone growth—by 19 percent.
  8. You’ll Get into Shape Faster: The term cardio shouldn’t describe only aerobic exercise: A study found that circuit training with weights raises your heart rate 15 beats per minute higher than if you ran at 60 to 70 percent of your max heart rate. This approach strengthens muscles and provides cardiovascular benefits similar to those of aerobic exercise—so you save time without sacrificing results.
  9. Your Heart Will Be Healthier: Researchers at the University of Michigan found that people who did three total-body weight workouts a week for two months decreased their diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) by an average of eight points. That’s enough to reduce the risk of a stroke by 40 percent and the chance of a heart attack by 15 percent.
  10. You’ll Be Way More Productive: Lifting could result in a raise (or at least a pat on the back from your boss). Researchers found that workers were 15 percent more productive on days they exercised compared with days they didn’t. So on days you work out, you can (theoretically) finish in eight hours what would normally take nine hours and 12 minutes. Or you’d still work for nine hours but get more done, leaving you feeling less stressed and happier with your job—another perk reported on days workers exercised.
  11. You’ll Live Longer: University of South Carolina researchers determined that total-body strength is linked to lower risks of death from cardiovascular disease and cancer. Similarly, other scientists found that being strong during middle age is associated with “exceptional survival,” defined as living to the age of 85 without developing a major disease.
  12. You’ll Be Even Smarter: Muscles strengthen your body and mind: Brazilian researchers found that six months of resistance training enhanced lifters’ cognitive function. In fact, the sweat sessions resulted in better short- and long-term memory, improved verbal reasoning, and a longer attention span.

So Ladies what are you going to do when you go to the gym? ;)

GRIP WIDTH AND FOREARM ORIENTATION EFFECTS ON MUSCLE ACTIVITY DURING THE LAT PULL-DOWN

 

STEPHEN J. LUSK, BRUCE D. HALE, AND DANIEL M. RUSSELL

Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University—Berks, Reading, Pennsylvania

 

ABSTRACT

 

Lusk, SJ, Hale, BD, and Russell, DM. Grip width and forearm orientation effects on muscle activity during the lat pull-down. J Strength Cond Res 24(7): 1895–1900, 2010—Based on electromyographic (EMG) studies, an anterior (in front of the face) wide grip with a pronated forearm has been recommended as the optimal lat pull-down (LPD) variation for strengthening the latissimus dorsi (LD) (Signorile, JF, Zink, A, and Szwed, S. J Strength Cond Res 16: 539–546, 2002; Wills, R, Signorile, J, Perry, A, Tremblay, L, and Kwiatkowski, K. Med Sci Sports Exerc 26: S20, 1994). However, it is not clear whether this finding was because of grip width or forearm orientation. This study aimed to resolve this issue by comparing wide-pronated, wide-supinated, narrow-pronated, and narrow-supinated grips of an anterior LPD. Twelve healthy men performed the 4 grip variations using an experimentally determined load of 70% of 1 repetition maximum. Two trials of 5 repetitions were analyzed for each grip type. Participants maintained a cadence of 2-second concentric and 2-second eccentric phases. The grip widths were normalized for each individual by using a wide grip that corresponded to their carrying width and a narrow grip that matched their biacromial diameter. Surface EMG of the LD, middle trapezius (MT), and biceps brachii (BB) was recorded, and the root mean square of the EMG was normalized, using a maximum isometric voluntary contraction. Repeated-measures analysis of variance for each muscle revealed that a pronated grip elicited greater LD activity than a supinated grip (p , 0.05), but had no influence of grip type on the MT and BB muscles. Based on these findings, an anterior LPD with pronated grip is recommended for maximally activating the LD, irrespective of the grip width (carrying width or biacromial diameter).

 

KEY WORDS EMG, latissimus dorsi, pronation, supination

 

INTRODUCTION

During a lat pull-down (LPD), the humerus is adducted under load via a pulley system. This exercise is commonly employed in an effort to strengthen the latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle, hence its name, and is also expected to activate the rhomboids, middle trapezius (MT), and biceps brachii (BB) muscles. There are several different variations of body position, grip width, and forearm orientation that can be employed. The bar can be pulled down in front of the face (anterior LPD) or behind the head (posterior LPD), the hands can be narrowly or widely spaced, and the radioulnar joint

can be pronated or supinated. Yet research to determine the optimal variation of the LPD for particular muscle development is limited. Currently, much of the literature on the strength-building capacity of this exercise is based on

personal beliefs and experiences (3,4,16), although a few investigations have used electromyography (EMG) to quantify the amount of activity in different muscles during different types of LPDs (10,12,14,15). These studies have provided several scientifically based weight training recommendations, but questions remain about the most effective combination of grip width and forearm orientation. Research has led to the general consensus that the anterior LPD is preferred to the posterior LPD. Most studies comparing the activity of the LD under both conditions have found that the anterior LPD elicits greater muscle activation (by EMG) than the posterior LPD (11,12,14). Only 1 study failed to observe any significant difference in muscle activity between anterior and posterior LPDs (15). There have also been safety concerns that pulling down the bar behind the head puts the arm into horizontal abduction with excessive external rotation, placing unnecessary stress on the anterior shoulder (4,9,16). Functionally, it would also appear that the anterior LPD more closely mimics activities of daily living than the posterior LPD. Because of these past results and safety concerns, the current research investigation focused only on variations of the anterior LPD. A wide grip front pull (anterior) has been proposed as the most effective LPD variation for the developing the LD (12). This claimis based solely on 2 EMGstudies comparing a wide grip-pronated forearm position (wide-pronated [WP]) with a narrow grip–supinated forearm position (narrow supinated [NS]), which have found significantly greater LD activation with WP than NS (12,15). However, 1 EMG study failed to observe any significant difference in LD activity between WP and NS conditions (10). These contradictory results may be explained by 2 major differences in experimental design. Firstly, EMG was recorded during an isometric contraction (10) in contrast to EMG of concentric and eccentric phases of the LPD (12,15). Recording EMG during isotonic muscle actions provides a better assessment of the amount of muscle activity during a typical LPD exercise. Secondly, participants selected their own workload (10), with most performing at about 30–40% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM), whereas the workload was experimentally controlled in the other 2 studies at 10RM (12) and 70% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) (15). It is more valid to assess muscle activity at a level close to typical training workloads (e.g., 70% of 1RM as per American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines [1] for strength training), rather than 30–40% of 1RM. These criticisms suggest that the observation of greater LD activity for the WP than the NS grip (12,15) is a more valid and reliable finding for providing isotonic exercise recommendations. However, the recommendation that a wide grip is preferred over a narrow grip (12,13) cannot be directly drawn from the finding of an advantage of WP over NS. In addition to varying the grip width between conditions (7), the forearm orientation (pronation vs. supination) was altered too. Therefore, the benefit of WP over NS on LD activation could arise from grip width, forearm orientation, or some combination of the 2. Therefore, the goal of the current study was to resolve this dilemma by comparing all 4 possible combinations of grip width and forearm orientation in a fully balanced design: WP, wide supinated (WS), narrow pronated (NP), and NS. These combinations have not been previously tested, we only hypothesize that WP will activate LD more than NS. This study will also assess MTand BB, because these muscles are also believed to be trained during an LPD (9,10,14).

 

METHODS

 

Experimental Approach to the Problem

 

Although the anteriorWPgrip has been recommended as the most effective and safest type of LPD (12), it is not clear whether this is because of the particular grip width or forearm orientation used, as previous studies have confounded these variables. The current study employed a balanced design to compare grip width (wide vs. narrow), forearm orientation (pronated vs. supinated), and any interaction, by testing WP, WS, NP, and NS anterior grips. The sequence of these conditions was randomized in an effort to negate any possible effects of practice or fatigue. To normalize grip width for different sized individuals, we standardized the grip width based on anthropometric measures. As with previous research, the biacromial diameter was used as the narrow grip width (10,12). There is no standard width for a wide grip. One study employed 150% of biacromial diameter (10), whereas another used the distance from the fist to the seventh cervical vertebrae (12). In an effort to use an anthropometric measure that relates to a wide-grip LPD, we employed _carrying width. This is the distance between the hands (left to right fifth metacarpophalangeal joint) when standing in the anatomical reference position. A standard LPD bar was used for all grips. To standardize the weight across conditions, 70% of 1RM was determined from participants performing a test of 1RM according to ACSM guidelines (1) at least 48 hours before testing. Because a previous study (12) found no significant difference for 10RM between WP and NS grips (,1 kg), we used a single 1RMtest. Although the LPD is primarily used to develop the LD, it is also performed to train the MT and BB (9,10,14). Therefore, EMG signals were recorded from the LD, MT, and BB muscles. In accordance with previous research, the root mean square of each EMG signal (rmsEMG) was employed to quantify the average muscle activity (10,12,15). The rmsEMG for each participant and condition was then normalized to the rmsEMG of an isometric MVC. The normalized rmsEMG was then compared across conditions by using a 2 3 2 (width 3 orientation) repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) separately for each muscle.This experimental design permits an empirical test of which combination of grip width and forearm orientation elicits the most activity in the LD, MT, and BB.

 

Subjects

 

Participants were 12 men aged 19–30 with an average age = 22.7 ± 3.1 years. The participants’ average mass was 85.86 ± 11.94 kg, and their average height was 1.82 ± 0.10 m. The average biacromial diameter for all participants was 0.40 ± 0.03m, and the average carrying width was 0.76 ± 0.06 m.The average 1RM for all participants was 99.46 ± 19.58 kg. Participants were all free of known musculoskeletal problems of the upper body. This study only examined participants who were previously familiar with the LPD lift and currently lifted weights on a regular basis but were not competitive bodybuilders, weightlifters, or powerlifters. All subjects were tested during the 2008 fall semester at the Berks Campus

of Pennsylvania State University. The Institutional Review Board for the use of human subjects of the Pennsylvania State University granted permission for this study. Participants signed an informed consent after being informed of the experimental risks of the study and before any data collection.

 

Equipment

 

Participants used a standard lat bar on the LPD station of a 4-Stack Multi-Jungle weight machine (Model SM40; Life Fitness, Schiller Park, IL, USA). An auditory quartz metronome (Model XB700; Franz Mfg. Co. Inc., East Haven, CT, USA) was used to provide a consistent cadence throughout the study. Disposable Ag–AgCl pregelled snap electrodes (EL501; BIOPAC Systems, Inc., Goleta, CA) were placed in pairs over the skin, and parallel to the fibers, of the LD, MT, and BB muscles. The LD electrodes were positioned obliquely (25_ above the horizontal) and 0.04 m below the inferior angle of the scapula (6). The MT electrodes were placed 0.03 m lateral to the second spinous process of the thoracic spine with the electrodes placed parallel to muscle fibers (5). The second thoracic vertebra was located by palpating for the seventh cervical vertebrae and counting the spinous processes in a descending fashion until the second

thoracic vertebrae was located and marked. If differentiating the seventh cervical vertebrea was problematic, the participant was instructed to bend the head forward to differentiate the most prominent cervical vertebrea from the first thoracic vertebra (13). The BB electrodes were placed one-third the distance from the cubital fossa to the acromion process (17). Ground electrodes were placed on the acromion process (1 electrode) and the spine of the scapula (2 electrodes). The skin sites were initially prepared by shaving the hair and abrading the skin, before cleaning with an alcohol swab. The distance between the electrode centers was standardized at 0.0375 m. Three shielded lead sets (SS2; BIOPAC Systems Inc.) connected the electrodes to a 4-channel remote monitoring system (TEL100M-C; BIOPAC Systems Inc), which has an impedance of 2 MV and a common mode rejection ratio of 110 dB. All of the leads were taped in place with a loop on the skin and further secured with an elastic bandage around the participant’s torso and upper arm to reduce interference and were examined for stability during a simulated pull-down. The remote monitoring system was connected to a data acquisition and analysis system (MP100; BIOPAC Systems Inc.). The experimenters controlled data acquisition and postprocessing via AcqKnowledge software (version 3.7.3 for Windows; BIOPAC Systems Inc.) running on a microcomputer. Data were collected at a sampling rate of 500 Hz, and the raw EMG signals were amplified by a gain

set at 1,000.

 

Procedures

 

During the initial visit, the following anthropometric measurements were taken: height, weight, biacromial diameter, and carrying width. Biacromial diameter was measured from the lateral aspect of the left to the right acromion processes using anthropometric tape. Carrying width was measured by asking the participants to stand with the palm of their hands facing the sides of their legs. Then the participants were asked to supinate their radioulnar joints so that the palms faced forward, whereas the humeri were maintained beside the body (similar to the anatomical reference position). From this position, the carrying width was measured from the left fifth metacarpophalangeal joint to the right fifth metacarpophalangeal joint, using anthropometric tape. The carrying width was used as the wide grip (W), whereas the biacromial diameter was used as the narrow grip (N) in this study. After recording the anthropometric measures, the exercise protocol was described. Although participants were familiar with an LPD exercise, the specific technique, inhalation and exhalation rhythm for lifting, and metronome pacing were prescribed. After ensuring that participants were comfortable performing the LPD as directed, a 1RM test was performed according to ACSM guidelines (1). The grip width for the 1RM was standardized with all participants placing the second phalanx on each hand at the bend in the bar with a pronated grip. The EMG testing session took place at least 48 hours after initial testing, and the participants were instructed not to exercise until final testing was completed. The EMG equipment was set up and zeroed before being connected to the electrodes that were placed on each participant. The participants performed the 4 conditions (WP, WS, NP, and NS) in a random order, using 70% of 1RM load. The cadence of 2-second concentric and 2-second eccentric phases was prescribed by an auditory beep and visual flash of a metronome. Participants performed 2 trials of 5 repetitions for each condition before moving onto the next, with a 2-minute rest between each trial and condition. The participants were again instructed visually and verbally how to perform an LPD. The thigh restraint pads were adjusted so the thigh and leg formed a 90_ angle with the feet flat on the floor (8). The participants were instructed to be slightly extended at the hips to prevent any collisions with the bar and head and to pull the lat bar down in a straight vertical plane from a slightly flexed position to the participant’s chin in a slow and controlled manner (9). The lat bar was lowered for them, and they remained seated for the entire testing session. Participants started with the elbows slightly flexed and the bar pulled down to the chin for all conditions. Although this meant the amplitude of the movements was not identical across conditions, it ensured the lifts were functionally equivalent. The movement was initiated with scapular depression and retraction, which was held throughout the length of the repetitions until the bar reached the resting position (4,9). The participants were then instructed to begin performing the lifts. The participants were told not to pause at each metronome beep, but slowly transition between the lifting and lowering phases, and requested to inspire on the eccentric, and expire on the concentric muscle actions. With participants performing the LPD correctly and at the right tempo, 5 repetitions were recorded, making up a 20-second trial. If a participant failed to perform correctly, the trial was repeated after a 2-minute rest. After testing all conditions, participants performed an isometric maximum exertion. The isometric exercise was an LPD with the shoulders abducted p/2 rad and both elbows flexed p/2 rad. Participants placed the second phalanx on each hand at the bend in the bar, with a pronated grip, as done for the 1RM test.

 

Electromyographic Analyses

 

For each trial and muscle, the raw EMG signal was amplified by a gain of 1,000 and filtered using a 10-Hz high pass filter (PE). The filtered EMG signal was then smoothed and rectified by calculating the root mean square (rmsEMG) for a 30-data sample moving window (0.06 seconds). The average rmsEMG was then computed for the 2 20-second trials under each condition. The raw EMG signal for each muscle during the maximal isometric contraction was processed in the same way as above, except that an average was computed for only 1 second of maximal activity to avoid effects of fatigue. To normalize the data (normalized root mean square of each EMG signal [NrmsEMG]), the average rmsEMG for each condition was divided by the average rmsEMG for the maximal isometric contraction.

 

Statistical Analyses

 

Normalized root mean square of each EMG signal was analyzed separately for each muscle by 32 x 2 (Width x Orientation) repeated-measures ANOVAs. All statistical procedures were performed using SPSS statistical software version 15.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA), and the alpha level was selected as p £ 0.05. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were computed for NrmsEMG of each muscle separately. All 3 dependent variables indicated strong consistency (ICC 0.87, 0.85, and 0.76 for LD, MT, and BB muscles, respectively).

 

RESULTS

 

No significant difference was found for LD activity between the wide and narrow grips (p =0.711, power = 0.064). In contrast, there was a significant main effect for forearm orientation on NrmsEMG of the LD (p = 0.012, power = 0.776). The LD demonstrated greater activation during a pronated hand grip (M= 0.67) than a supinated hand grip (M = 0.63) (see Figure 1 and Table 1). The interaction of grip width and hand orientation had no significant effect on LD activation (p = 0.185, power = 0.253). The statistical analyzes of the NrmsEMG of MT and BB muscles revealed no significant main effects or interactions (see Table 1).

 

DISCUSSION

 

In agreement with previous literature, a WP grip LPD elicited greater LD muscle activity than an NS grip LPD (12,15). However, our findings indicated this was because of using a pronated forearm orientation, not a wide grip width as proposed by others (12,15). Previous studies based their conclusions by comparing WP with NS, so that the results obtained could have been because of grip width, forearm orientation or a combination of the 2. To avoid this concern, we employed a fully balanced design to compare WP, WS, NP, and NS conditions. In contrast with prior recommendations, grip width did not significantly influence the LD, and neither was an interaction of grip width and orientation observed. The only significant finding indicated that the LD was more active under a pronated grip than a supinated grip. Hence, our results for identical conditions match previous studies of an isotonic LPD (12,15). The only findings they contradict are those for an isometric LPD, which found no differences in the LD between WP and NS grips (10). It would seem that results from an EMG analysis of isometric muscle actions are not necessarily applicable to an isotonic exercise. The different types of grip failed to significantly influence the EMG data for the MT and BB muscles. These findings agree with an earlier study that compared WP with NS and failed to observe any significant difference in muscle activation (10), but as noted above, those findings were based on an isometric LPD. It might have been predicted that with a supinated grip the BB has a more efficacious angle of pull, but there is no training advantage for the BB between the different types of grip tested. It is also useful to look at the amount of NrmsEMGfor each muscle, which indicates the proportion of maximum activity and therefore provides an estimate of the relative activity of each muscle. On average, the LD was activated at 65% of an isometric MVC, whereas the MT and BB were activated at 55 and 42%, respectively. Because the LPD was performed using a load of 70% 1RM, these results would indicate that the LD was being activated at appropriate training levels. In contrast, it would seem that both the MT and BB were activated at lower levels. This suggests that all 4 grip types primarily activated the LD, and to a lesser extent the MT and BB. Therefore, an LPD is best employed to strengthen the LD and is not an optimal exercise for developing the MT or BB muscles. We hypothesize that the LD is more active during a pronated grip vs. a supinated grip because of a greater joint moment at the shoulder. Previous research has suggested that a WP grip involves greater abduction and horizontal abduction than an NS grip, which in turn leads to more LD activity (12). However, the finding here that grip width had no significant effect on the electrical activity of the muscles contradicts this proposal. With the LD being less active during a supinated grip, it might be expected that other muscles would compensate by being more active. Surprisingly, both MT and BB were active at similar levels for all 4 grips. Also, in another EMG study, which compared WP and NS grips, none of the muscles (pectoralis major, posterior deltoid, triceps brachii, and teres major) assessed were more active during an NS grip. These findings suggest that a pronated grip places the shoulder at a mechanical disadvantage that requires greater LD activity but does not affect the MT or BB muscles. A biomechanical analysis of joint moments during a pull-up (2) provides an explanation for our results. The analysis revealed that using a pronated grip leads to a larger overall perpendicular distance between the shoulder joint and pull-up bar than a supinated grip, causing a greater joint moment at the shoulder. In addition, the wrist and elbow joints, and shoulder girdle were not found to be significantly involved during the pull-up, nor were they influenced by the forearm orientation. Because the pull-up is similar to the LPD, we propose that a pronated LPD grip creates a larger joint moment at the shoulder than a supinated grip, which in turn requires greater LD activity to lift the same load.

 

PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS

 

With the main goal of an LPD being to develop the LD muscles, it is important to know which variation best activates this muscle. The findings from this study indicate that a pronated grip is optimal for training the LD in an anterior LPD. Contrary to the claim that a wide grip is best (12,15), the findings here show that there is no difference between narrow and wide grip widths with a pronated grip orientation. Prior research has identified safety concerns and reduced LD muscle activity for a posterior LPD (12). Taking these results together, we conclude that an anterior LPD with a pronated grip is recommended for safely and optimally training the LD, irrespective of the grip width (either carrying width or biacromial diameter). Although the MTand BB were active at similar levels for the different grip types of LPD, other exercises are likely to better train these muscles.

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This study was funded by a Division of Science Undergraduate

Research Grant, The Pennsylvania State University

Berks, Reading, PA.

 

REFERENCES

1. American College of Sports Medicine. ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise

Testing and Prescription. (7th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott,

Williams, &Wilkins, 2006.

2. Antinori, F, Felici, F, Figura, F, Marchetti, M, and Ricci, B.

Joint moments and work in pull-ups. J Sports Med Phys Fitness

28: 132–137, 1988.

3. Baechle, TR and Earle, RW. Essentials of Strength Training and

Conditioning Resistance Training. (2nd ed.). Champaign, IL: Human

Kinetics, 2000.

4. Crate, T. Analysis of the lat pull down. J Strength Cond Res

19: 26–29, 1996.

5. Ekstrom, RA, Soderberg, GL, and Donatelli, RA. Normalization

procedures using maximum voluntary isometric contractions for the

serratus anterior and the trapezius muscles during surface EMG

analysis. J Electromyogr Kinesiol 15: 418–428, 2004.

6. Escamilla, RF, Babb, E, Dewitt, R, Jew, P, Kelleher, P, Burnham, T,

Busch, J, D’Anna, K, Mowbray, R, and Imamura, RT. Electromyographic

analysis of traditional and nontraditional abdominal

exercises: Implications for rehabilitation and training. Phys Ther

85: 656–671, 2006.

7. Funk, DA, An, KN, Morrey, BF, and Daube, JR. Electromyographic

analysis of muscles across elbow joint. J Orthop Res 5: 529–538, 1987.

8. Graham, JF. Front lat pulldown. Strength Cond J 25: 42–43, 2003.

9. Lantz, J andMcNamara, S.Modifying the latissimus pull-down exercise

for athletes with shoulder injury. Strength Cond J 25: 67–69, 2003.

10. Lehman, GJ, Buchan, DD, Lundy, A, Myers, N, and Nalborczyk, A.

Variations in muscle activation levels during traditional latissimus

dorsi weight training exercises: An experimental study. Dyn Med

3: 4, 2004.

11. Pugh,GM.Abiomechanical comparison on the front and rear lat pulldown

exercise. Master’s thesis, University of Florida, Gainesville, 2003.

12. Signorile, JF, Zink, A, and Szwed, S. A comparative electromyographical

invesigation ofmuscle utilization patterns using various hand

positions during the lat pull down. J Strength Cond Res

16: 539–546, 2002.

13. Smith, LK, Weiss, EL, and Lehmkuhl, LD. Brunnstrom’s Clinical

Kinesiology. (5th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: F. A. Davis, 1996.

14. Tooru, H, Hiroto, K, Shin, H, Jun’ichi, O, and Kiyotada, K.

Comparative electromyographical investigation of the biceps

brachii, latissimus dorsi, and trapezius muscles during five pull

exercises. Jpn J Phys Fitness Sports Med 54: 159–168, 2005.

15. Wills, R, Signorile, J, Perry, A, Tremblay, L, and Kwiatkowski, K.

Differences in EMG activity due to handgrip position during the lat

pulldown. Med Sci Sports Exerc 26: S20, 1994.

16. Yessis, M. Front lat pull-down. Muscle Fitness March: 37–39,

1997.

17. Zipp, P. Recommendations for the standardization of lead positions

in surface electromyography. Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol

26: 41–54, 1982.

 

Prep Time: 20 minutes (4 hours marinate time extra)

Cook Time 14 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup orange-ginger salad dressing
  • 2 tbsp. less sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 4- 6 oz. boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • 4 pineapple slices, 1/2 inch thick
  • 1- 5oz. package spring greens salad mix
  • 1 red bell pepper, roasted, peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2 inch strips; or 3/4 cup bottled roasted red pepper strips
  • 1/2 red onion, cut into thin wedges

Directions:

  1. IN a small bowl whisk together dressing, soy sauce and honey. Place chicken in a large resealable plastic bag. Add half the dressing mixture. Seal bag; refrigerate 4 hours. Cover and refrigerate remaining dressing until serving time.
  2. Coat grill rack with nonstick cooking spray. Preheat grill to medium (350-400F). Remove chicken from marinade; discard marinade. Place chicken and pineapple slices on grill. Grill pineapple 5-7 minutes per side. Grill chicken 6-7 minutes per side or until an instant read thermometer registers 165F.
  3. Remove chicken and pineapple from grill; cut into 1-inch pieces. In a large serving bowl combine spring greens, chicken, pineapple, bell pepper and onion. Drizzle with remaining dressing, toss to coat, and serve.

Nutrition Facts per Serving: 270 cals, 11g carb, 31g of protein

***This one takes a little longer cause you have to marinade your chicken but you can even let it marinate for an hour and it will still turn out good.***

4 Things Women Should Be Doing in Their Fitness Training—But Aren’t.

If your workouts consist of doing light weights and steady-state cardio, you might be in for some bad news: These things alone won’t likely get you the results you’re after, say experts. To increase your fitness level, burn fat, and improve muscle tone, you’ve got to step up your game.

Here are four things women tend to skip that can deliver serious results.

1. High-intensity training.

All that time coasting on the elliptical at a comfortable pace probably hasn’t done much for your body, says Panama-based trainer Belinda Benn, creator of the Breakthrough Physique home fitness system. In fact, the biggest mistake women make in their training is not exercising with enough intensity, she says.

High-intensity interval training, or HIIT, is typically a 10- to 20-minute workout that alternates short, intense bursts of activity with moderate-exertion recovery periods. “High-intensity interval training  is the best way to improve your overall fitness, burn fat, and stimulate your hormones for a stronger body,” says Benn.

How to tell if you’re training hard enough? Look to your body for clues, Benn says. Good indicators are sweating, increased heart rate, and lactic acid production (i.e., feeling the “burn”) during exercise. Moderate muscle soreness for up to a few days post-workout is also a good sign. “If you feel nothing,” Benn says, “you probably didn’t work out hard enough.”

2. Heavier lifting.

For most women, a typical weight-training session equals light dumbbell exercises, says Toronto-based strength and conditioning specialist Craig Ballantyne, creator of the Turbulence Training Program. But doing fewer reps with more weight—say, 8 reps per set with a 15-pound dumbbell, instead of 15 reps with an 8-pound one—will burn more fat, he says. Lifting heavier will also increase your strength and muscle definition.

Start by swapping out your normal weights for slightly heavier ones, and gradually work your way up.

3. Upper body workouts.

Women tend to store body fat around the waist, hips, and thighs, so that’s where they typically focus their exercise efforts—neglecting their upper bodies, Benn says.

But you can’t spot-reduce fat, and sticking with what’s easy can stunt your progress, says Benn. Because you may feel weak while attempting pull-ups for the first time, Benn suggests doing the hard stuff at the start of your workout, “when you’re freshest and feeling mentally strong.”

“Focusing on underdeveloped muscles will improve the contours of your body,” Benn says.

4. Training with a barbell.

Think barbells are synonymous with back-breaking chest presses? Not so. “You can do a tremendous workout just with a barbell,” Benn says. “If you’re holding a bar rather than using two separate weights, it forces you to get your body  in sync.”

Barbells are great for both upper- and lower-body exercises. Balancing one across your shoulders while doing squats, lunges, or walking lunges helps develop posture and balance, Benn says.

If you’re flirting with a barbell for the first time, go as light as you need to. Even 10 pounds is a good start.

Bonus tip:

If you’re worried you’ll bulk up with any of these exercises, consider your body type. Benn says women generally fall into two categories: those who build muscle easily, and those who don’t. If you build muscle easily, she suggests emphasizing high-intensity exercises. If you develop muscle slowly, you’ll benefit from spending more time on heavy lifting.

Chelsea Bush writes for AskFitnessCoach, a site that promotes a down-to-earth approach to fitness and weight loss

Answering YOUR questions…

Question 1: What’s your advice on obtaining the smallest waist possible for my body?

  • Diet, Diet, Diet!

Question 2: Can I build muscle and lose fat at the same time?

  • Yes and No. I say no because in order to lose fat you have to cut back on how many calories you consume and in order to build muscle you have to increase how many calories you consume on a daily basis. But studies have shown that with the proper weight training and nutrition you can build muscle while you burn fat. This has been proven true with a lot of track athletes because of high intensity interval training along with a high intensity resistance program.

Question 3: Just how much protein do I need?

  • Protein needs are usually based on what your goal is. But the usual formula is 1g of protein times your body weight ex: 1g x 128 = 128g of protein per day.

Question 5: What are some examples of good HIT workouts?

Here are a few HIT workouts that I do myself:

HIT #1

  • Shoulder Press
  • Crunches
  • Standing Calf Raises
  • Barbell Curls
  • Bench Press
  • Lying Leg Curls
  • Bent Over Row
  • Seated Calf Raises
  • Squats
  • Reverse Crunches
  • Straight Arm Pullovers
  • French Presses
  • Deadlifts
  • Upright Rows
  • Crunches
  • Wrist curls

 

HIT #2

  • Deadlift 1 x 10-12
  • Leg Press 1 x 10-12
  • Shrug 1 x 8-10
  • Close Grip Lat Pulldown 1 x 8-10
  • Standing Calf Raise 1 x 10-15
  • Reverse Curls 1 x 10-15
  • Overhead Press 1 x 8-10
  • Abs 1 x 30-50

Question 6: How much rest do we need between workouts?

  • Rest between workouts is all dependent upon the person. I personally take 2 days off after I do 4 days straight. After I take those 2 days off I cycle my workouts and start again. To answer your question: Just listen to your body.

Product Review: Better Oats

Ok so I know you’re all like what’s Better Oats…WELL it’s the best tasting oatmeal on the market. I love oatmeal and I have never tasted anything this good. They have: Oat Revolution, Abundance, Good n Hearty, Lavish (Chocolate), Muffins, Oat Fit, Oat Heads, RAW: Pure and Simple, and Naturals Instant Oatmeal.

The ones I have tried are Abundance and Muffins.

Abundance I buy Maple and Brown Sugar and Muffins I get Maple Streusel

You’re wondering what is SSSOOO GREAT about Oatmeal I will tell you.

Abundance has:

  • 6 whole grains, 30g per serving
  • Real fruit pieces
  • Omega-3 from flaxseed
  • Good source of protein and fiber

As you can tell Abundance has: Whole grain oats, flaxseed, barley, quinoa, etc. NOTHING BUT FIBER!! YUMMY!!

Now when it comes to Muffins

  • Thick and hearty texture
  • 30 grams of whole grains per serving
  • 220 mg of ALA Omega-3 per serving
  • Excellent source of antioxidant vitamins A & E
  • Good source of Fiber

mmm….Muffins has whole grain rolled oats and flaxseed.

THIS OATMEAL IS AMAZING!!! What makes it so cool is that they come in little packets that allow you to measure your water into the packet and pour it into the oatmeal and stick it in the microwave. Honestly this is the coolest thing since sliced bread.

Go to betteroats.com or your nearest grocery store and try it out for yourself.

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